Inmotion
the offical newsletter of DALLAS AREA RAPID TRANSIT - Spring/Summer 2011
Skip to main content
Return to index
Return to www.DART.org

DART FY2010 Financials
(2.0MB PDF file)

Agent of Change
A letter from the DART Chairman of the Board.

Transforming How We Travel
With the opening of the Green Line on December 6, DART now shifts much of its focus to operating the vast multimodal transit system, improving the customer experience, upgrading buses and trains, and increasing ridership.

Leading the Rail-volution
Construction of the Orange Line to Irving and the Blue Line to Rowlett is well under way, and planning continues for additional light rail and modern streetcars in downtown Dallas and commuter rail along the Cotton Belt Corridor.

Taking a Regional View to Growth
The continued growth of the Dallas-Fort Worth area has led to increasing traffic congestion and air pollution, leading cities throughout North Texas to consider bus and rail transit as a strategy to improve mobility.

Improving the Work Experience
Employee communications, professional and personal development initiatives strive to make DART an employer of choice. Education, diversity and outreach programs illustrate the agency's commitment to the communities DART serves.

Adopting New Business Models
Updated financial projections initiated a comprehensive review of operating, capital, and debt service expenses, resulting in a new business model that resets the expansion timeline, seeks efficiencies, and uses resources more effectively.

Short Trips
Green Line earns industry accolades; Agency hailed as design-build leader; Whitewater park created near station; DART CIO helps lead IT consortium; Quick-read codes link to TVM video; Transit attracts young professionals.

DART Board of Directors

DART Current and Future Services Map

DART: Live, On Tape and Online

Contact Webmaster at:
[email protected]
 



Leading the Rail-volution


With 72 miles of light rail now in operation, DARTís expansion continues in 2011 with The new Green Line made rail transit a viable choice for thousands of commuters.construction of the first two segments of the Orange Line serving North Irving and the Las Colinas Urban Center to the northwest. Work also is proceeding on a 4.5-mile extension of the Blue Line linking downtown Garland and downtown Rowlett to the northeast.

Both projects are slated for completion in December 2012.

In September 2010, the Orange Line was honored by the U.S. government as one of the top four of the 100 Recovery Act Projects Changing America for its ability to create jobs and attract additional development.

The new Green Line made rail transit a viable choice
for thousands of commuters.

'Across the region, transit has become a deciding factor in the location of new development,' says DART President/Executive Director Gary Thomas.
The Orange Line travels down the center of Lake Carolyn Parkway as designed in Las Colinas' master plan. Inset: President/Executive Director Gary Thomas tours the new Northwest Rail Operating Facility.



Advancing the Orange Line

Branching off from the Green Line at Bachman Station, the 14-mile, $1.2-billion Orange Line to North Irving/Las Colinas and DFW International Airport is well under way.
Elevators at Irving's Las Colinas Urban Center Station will connect riders to Las Colinas' people-mover system.
Construction of the rail extension's first nine miles is proceeding with most of the stations taking shape, and light rail service to Belt Line Station is scheduled to open by the end of 2012.

"We worked with DART to route the Orange Line through the Las Colinas Urban Center, knowing it would be a catalyst to the revitalization of this district," says Irving Mayor Herbert Gears. "Anchored by the new convention center, the Urban Center will be home to the largest collection of planned transit-oriented development in the nation with nearly $4 billion in projects."


Elevators at Irving's Las Colinas Urban Center Station will connect riders to Las Colinas' people-mover system.

The Orange Line extension connecting Belt Line Station to DFW Airport will transport passengers to Terminal A. A Request for Proposals has been issued for the final segment linking Belt Line Station to DFW Airport Terminal A. Efforts are under way to award a design-build contract for the five-mile project by the end of 2011 to fast-track its completion by December 2014. Meanwhile, the airport has begun their part, awarding a contract for construction of the future light rail station adjacent to Terminal A.

The Orange Line extension connecting Belt Line Station to DFW Airport will transport passengers to Terminal A.


Orange Line and Blue Line extensions
View the DART Current and Future Services Map



The new Irving Convention Center Station is taking shape next to the newly built events facility. The Orange Line's initial five stations were chosen to serve these key regional destinations:
  • University of Dallas
  • Las Colinas Urban Center
  • Irving Convention Center
  • North Lake College
  • Belt Line, on DFW International Airport property


  • The new Irving Convention Center Station is taking shape next to the newly built events facility.


    Extending the Blue Line

    The Blue Line extension to Rowlett is on budget and schedule. This 4.5 mile, $275-million project is anticipated to reinvigorate the city.

    "Rowlett is poised for development that embraces our unique and beautiful setting on the banks of Lake Ray Hubbard," says Rowlett City Manager Lynda Humble.

    "The Blue Line extension is precisely the economic engine we need to revitalize that portion of our city." DART and Rowlett officials ceremonially broke ground on the Downtown Rowlett Station in March 2011.

    Plans also are in place to extend the Blue Line southward approximately three miles from Ledbetter Station, adding two new stations at Simpson Stuart Road and the University of North Texas at Dallas.

    Public Transportation Saves Money

    Annually, households where at least one driver takes public transportation on a given day may:
    • Reduce driving by 4,400 miles
    • Consume 223 fewer gallons of gas
    • Save more than $9,000

    Spurring the Economy

    At the height of construction, up to 2,200 workers a day were involved in construction of the three rail extensions. DART's multibillion-dollar expansion is contributing to economic recovery across North Texas and ensuring better mobility for decades to come. With work on three rail lines underway in FY 2010, the transit agency was responsible for nearly $4 billion in active contracts.

    According to a University of North Texas study, this massive public works project will generate more than 6,000 jobs annually and $4 billion in economic activity through 2013. Likewise, the new stations promise to pay big dividends in the form of transit-oriented development (TOD). To date, private developers and member cities have built, planned or announced more than $8 billion in TODs around existing and future station sites.

    At the height of construction, up to 2,200 workers a day were involved in construction of the three rail extensions.


    Increased rail traffic will drive the timing of a second rail line through downtown Dallas

    Analyzing Alternatives Downtown

    The expansion of the DART Rail System has prompted the future need for a second downtown light rail line, known as the D2 project. A $700,000 grant from the Federal Transit Administration is funding a continued alternatives analysis, which will culminate in the selection of a Locally Preferred Alternative.


    Increased rail traffic will drive the timing of a second rail line through downtown Dallas



    Getting Modern Streetcars on Track

    Modern streetcars similar to this one may soon travel between downtown Dallas and North Oak Cliff. In February 2010, the U.S. Department of Transportation awarded the North Central Texas Council of Governments a $23 million stimulus grant toward a starter streetcar system between Union Station and North Oak Cliff, to be owned by the City of Dallas. In a unique partnership, the city is paying DART to procure and manage a planning consultant and provide technical direction.

    "The City of Dallas' goal is not just to build this one segment but to develop a productive modern streetcar system that both integrates with DART's light rail system and generates economic development, livability and sustainability," says Jay Kline, DART's liaison with the city on streetcars.

    Modern streetcars similar to this one may soon travel between downtown Dallas and North Oak Cliff.




    Advancing the Cotton Belt

    Meanwhile, DART is planning commuter rail service along the Cotton Belt freight corridor, a 26-mile east-west rail line connecting the Red Line to DFW Airport. The Fort Worth Transportation Authority (The T) is pursuing a related project that would connect the airport to Southeast Fort Worth.

    Service along the Cotton Belt would be provided by self-propelled Light Rail New Technology vehicles. Preliminary engineering and environmental impact statements for DART's segment are underway to be "shovel ready" for potential federal funding. DART and The T have also commissioned the NCTCOG to identify innovative financing sources to accelerate the agencies' start of construction.

    "Across the region, transit has become a deciding factor in the location of new development," says DART President/Executive Director Gary Thomas. "As we advance our Orange and Blue lines and continue plans for the Cotton Belt and streetcar systems, it's exciting to think of what's to come."

    Service along the Cotton Belt would be provided by self-propelled Light Rail New Technology vehicles.


    Based on the Trinity Railway Express experience and responding to the concerns of communities along the Cotton Belt, DART has been working with the Federal Railroad Administration (FRA) and Federal Transit Administration to develop a new rail vehicle.

    The Light Rail New Technology vehicle will meet FRA design and safety regulations for operation on freight corridors, but will be self-propelled and operate with noise levels comparable to a DART Super Light Rail Vehicle.

    DART Rail System Proposed Cotton Belt PPP



    Leading Congestion Management Initiatives

    Variable-message signs alert motorists to traffic congestion, roadway conditions and travel alternatives. DART is the lead agency in a new demonstration project of the U. S. Department of Transportation's Integrated Corridor Management program. A $5.3 million grant supports development of a Dallas "511" realtime traveler information system that provides current travel conditions along the U.S. 75/Central Expressway corridor from Dallas to Plano.

    "The region's growth has outpaced the ability to construct enough highways," says Koorosh Olyai, assistant vice president, Mobility Programs Development, "so we have to find ways to manage transportation resources more effectively."

    Variable-message signs alert motorists to traffic congestion, roadway conditions and travel alternatives.


    Managed HOV lanes would be open to single occupancy vehicles through a toll collection system DART and regional partners also are finalizing plans to convert some of the region's network of 84 miles of High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) lanes to managed, or toll, lanes. Excess capacity can be sold as carpools and single-occupant vehicles are charged at variable rates based on vehicle and lane occupancy.

    The goal is to convert the I-35E South/US 67 and I-635 East lanes to managed HOV lanes by 2012.

    Managed HOV lanes would be open to single occupancy vehicles through a toll collection system

    Vanpools provide rideshare options for commuters within Dallas, Denton or Collin counties.


    Vanpools provide rideshare options for commuters within Dallas, Denton or Collin counties.






    Return to the Inmotion front page